UCLA Computational Genomics Summer Institute

ipam-logoDear Colleagues,

I am happy to announce the UCLA Computational Genomics Summer Institute, which is a new National Institutes of Health funded program at UCLA jointly hosted with the Institute of Pure and Applied Mathematics (IPAM). The program will take place each summer for one month. The dates for 2016 are July 18th – August 12th.

The program focuses on providing training in methodology development for genomics. We hope that it will be of interest to researchers at all levels. Our program builds upon a successful program hosted by IPAM in 2011 on “Mathematical and Computational Approaches in High Throughput Biology.” IPAM is a national math institute funded by the National Science Foundation.

The program consists of two parts. The first part (July 18th – July 22nd) is the Short Program which is in the format of a short course consisting of lectures from leading researchers in computational genomics. The short program is appropriate for researchers at all levels including both researchers actively involved in methodology development as well as other researchers who want to incorporate a methodology development aspect to their research program.

The second part (July 21st – August 12th) is the Long Program which is a continuation of the Short Program. The program is in the style of a typical long program hosted at IPAM where participants have opportunity to interact and collaborate with each other as well as the leading researchers who will serve as program faculty. The program is targeted toward senior trainees such as senior students or post-docs through established researchers.

Researchers at all levels — students, post-docs, staff researchers, as well as junior and senior faculty — are encouraged to participate in the program. Funding is available to support faculty and participant costs during the program. Because space is limited in the program, we are requiring interested participants and potential program faculty to apply as soon as possible.

Application materials are available on the program website (http://computationalgenomics.bioinformatics.ucla.edu). For questions about the program, interested individuals should email uclacgsi@gmail.com.

Sincerely,
The UCLA CGSI Organizing Committee
Eleazar Eskin, UCLA, CGSI Director
Russel Caflisch, UCLA. IPAM Director
Eran Halperin, Tel Aviv University
John Novembre, University of Chicago
Ben Raphael, Brown University

Review Article: GWAS and Missing Heritability

cacm-coverA couple of years ago I was asked to write a review article on the progress of my field (computational genetics) targeted toward computer scientists. My article “Discovering Genes Involved in Disease and the Mystery of Missing Heritability” was just published on the cover of the Communications of the ACM. This article is written to be an introduction to the field as well as describe the rapid progress over the past decade in terms of the discovery of large number of variants involved in common human diseases. The article is written assuming no background in biology and is designed to be accessible to researchers and students outside the field. I hope that it will encourage other computational researchers to get involved in genetics.  The journal also made a video highlighting this article which is available here:

Discovering Genes Involved in Disease and the Mystery of Missing Heritability from CACM on Vimeo.

The full citation to the article is:
 

Eskin, Eleazar

Discovering Genes Involved in Disease and the Mystery of Missing Heritability Journal Article

In: Commun. ACM, 58 (10), pp. 80-87, 2015, ISSN: 0001-0782.

Abstract | Links | BibTeX

Video Tutorial: An Introduction to Read Mapping and Next Generation Sequencing

We teach a course called “Computational Genetics” each year at UCLA. This course is taken by both graduate and undergraduate students from both the Computer Science department and the many biology and medical school programs. In this course we cover both topics related to genome wide association studies (GWAS) and topics related to next generation sequencing studies. One lecture that is given each year is an introductory lecture to sequencing and read mapping. The video of this lecture is available here. Please excuse the poor cinematography. This lecture was recorded from the back of the classroom.